Golden-winged_Warbler_03.JPG

Paul Martin

Associate Professor

I grew up as a birder in Ottawa, Canada, where my fascination with the origins and maintenance of diversity began. In our lab, we use a broad array of approaches (field- and lab-based, comparative analyses) to address questions of interest, and collaborate with many scientists in areas outside of our main research foci. All of our research is based on a deep appreciation of natural history. Much of our current work takes place at the Queen’s University Biological Station (Ontario, Canada).

email: pm45@queensu.ca

My full contact Information is at the bottom of this page.

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Kate Mitchell

MSc student

I grew up in Northern Ontario, surrounded by nature and curious about the ecological diversity I saw every time I stepped outside. I am very excited to be pursuing my interest through research. For my thesis, I will be studying how the microbial competition for burying beetles (Nicrophorus spp.) varies across habitats and seasons, and whether beetle species occupying high-competition environments have stronger antimicrobial secretions. I will also be pursuing my interest in conservation by studying the effects of wind turbines on wintering raptors. 

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

email: 16kem12@queensu.ca

Kate_M.jpeg

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Erin Bolger

Honours thesis student

I used to be scared of bugs. Then, I joined the Martin lab. Now I work with bugs every single day and love it! My honours thesis project involves the fundamental question: why do burying beetles bury? I am investigating the fitness benefits of burial for Nicrophorus burying beetles, and I am also interested in the factors that affect burial depth. 

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

email: 18eekb2@queensu.ca

Erin_B_2_edited.png

Brendan Sheppard

Honours thesis student

My research focuses on how closely related species coexist and why they diversify. I'm currently working with compiled datasets on behavioural dominance in birds to investigate how the costs of novel adaptation can influence competitive ability. My other work includes hunting for evidence of directional hybridization in birds, and surveying the activity and distribution of Nicrophorus burying beetles at QUBS.

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

email: 18bras@queensu.ca

Brendan_S.png