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PEOPLE

Paul Martin

GRADUATE STUDENTS


Rachel Fanelli  (co-advised with Fran Bonier)
Adam Groulx
Haley Kenyon

Kate Mitchell
Samreen Munim

 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS


Eryn Basham
Sophie Johnston
Yohanna Vangenne

Previous Students

Paul Martin

Associate Professor

I grew up as a birder in Ottawa, Canada, where my fascination with the origins and maintenance of diversity began. In our lab, we use a broad array of approaches (field- and lab-based, comparative analyses) to address questions of interest, and collaborate with many scientists in areas outside of our main research foci. All of our research is based on a deep appreciation of natural history. Much of our current work takes place at the Queen’s University Biological Station (Ontario, Canada).

email: pm45@queensu.ca

My full contact Information is at the bottom of this page.

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Rachel Fanelli  

MSc student  (co-advised with Fran Bonier)

My research uses a comparative approach to identify the factors that limit species distributions in cities. My current focus is looking at how habitat availability influences the occurrence of and interactions between two closely related species of bird that breed in Kingston, Ontario as part of the Urban Birds of Ontario Project.

Contact:
Queen's Biology Department
Biosciences Complex, 3441
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77537
email: 19ref@queensu.ca

 

Adam Groulx

PhD student

My research interests primarily involve behavioural ecology, entomology and interspecies interactions. As such, I am intending to study the ecology of burying beetle (Nicrophorus spp.) communities in southern Ontario as well as conduct comparative work with avian species. I will be looking into the potential role that trade-offs in functional traits play in structuring communities of related species.

 

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334

email: 18ag54@queensu.ca

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Haley Kenyon

PhD student

My research revolves around understanding the role that premating reproductive barriers, such as song and colour, play in speciation in birds. Most recently, my work has used a combination of song analysis, genomic analysis and playback experiments to examine song as a reproductive barrier in avian hybrid zones. 

 

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334

email: haley.kenyon@queensu.ca

Kate Mitchell

MSc student

I grew up in Northern Ontario, surrounded by nature and curious about the ecological diversity I saw every time I stepped outside. I am very excited to be pursuing my interest through research. For my thesis, I will be studying how the microbial competition for burying beetles (Nicrophorus spp.) varies across habitats and seasons, and whether beetle species occupying high-competition environments have stronger antimicrobial secretions. I will also be pursuing my interest in conservation by studying the effects of wind turbines on wintering raptors. 

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334

email: 16kem12@queensu.ca

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Samreen Munim

MSc student

I enjoy thinking about broad questions mostly pertaining to the fields of evolutionary ecology and community ecology. Why do we see certain species in certain places? What mechanisms allow species to coexist in those places? For my thesis, I will be exploring these themes as they relate to a group of New World sparrow species breeding on the rocky outcrops of the Frontenac Arch.

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334

email: 11sm170@queensu.ca

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Eryn Basham

Honours thesis student

I find myself endlessly fascinated by the oddballs of nature, and the evolutionary history behind them. I am interested in viewing and understanding species variation in commensal species, and how that varies with human expansion and urbanization. Through previously collected videos, I will be analyzing variation in albatross feeding behaviours to determine a dominance hierarchy.

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334

email: 17eeb7@queensu.ca

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Sophie Johnston

Honours thesis student

I have always been passionate about the biological systems and processes occurring in nature. Currently I am developing a model that investigates how evolutionary fusion and reinforcement among interacting populations impacts speciation rates and the age of sister species across latitudes. For my thesis I will be investigating behavioural dominance in Albatrosses in relation to marine productivity and global range.

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334

email: 18slj1@queensu.ca

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Yohanna Vangenne

Honours thesis student

I have been fortunate enough to have had many travel opportunities, and through them gained a fascination with the patterns, interactions, and history that shape the natural world. My project will involve examining the behavioural dominance interactions of two species of beetle, each with unique behavioural characteristics. This will allow better understanding of how behavioural trade-offs impact the structure of ecological communities.

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,

Biosciences Complex, 4320

Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6

phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334

email: 17ydv@queensu.ca

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